Jane Stanfel Capturing Forever


Gallery
 
Watercolors

Kalispell Area

Available
Price: US $800
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The Homestead and Barn
Oil on Canvas 16" x 20"

McCarthy/Pedersen Ranch
In 1892 John E. McCarthy, who came from Ireland, found 80 acres near Glacier he thought perfect for a farm. He applied for a homestead and received the patent, signed by President Grover Cleveland.  His dream came true, for he was now a farmer growing grain and raising horses, but it was not until 1903 that he built his home.  In 1907 Andrew Pederson bought the farm, built the new house, along with a granary, and raised chickens and dairy cows for 43 years. He increased the size of the farm to 91 acres.  In 1973 Gary Burt purchased the property, where he raised horses and dogs, and it is presently owned by Tom and Fran Towle.

Available
Price: US $600
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The Eleanor 
Oil on Canvas 12" x 24"

McCarthy/Pedersen Ranch
During the Depression, the WPA built the most up-to-date outhouses the nation had ever seen.  Dubbed “The Eleanor,” after President’s Roosevelt’s wife, its toilet seat automatically dropped when one closed the door.  This kept all the flies out of the pot and made usage about as comfortable as that type of facility permitted.

Available
Price: US $1300
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Harvesting
Oil on Barnwood 25" x 23"

McCarthy/Pedersen Ranch
Based upon an old photo, the painting depicts threshing when people relied upon real horsepower.

Available
Price: US $800
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The Little Red Barn
Oil on Canvas 16" x 20"

McCarthy/Pedersen Ranch
In 1892 John E. McCarthy, who came from Ireland, found 80 acres near Glacier he thought perfect for a farm. He applied for a homestead and received the patent, signed by President Grover Cleveland.  His dream came true, for he was now a farmer growing grain and raising horses, but it was not until 1903 that he built his home.  In 1907 Andrew Pederson bought the farm, built the new house, along with a granary, and raised chickens and dairy cows for 43 years. He increased the size of the farm to 91 acres.  In 1973 Gary Burt purchased the property, where he raised horses and dogs, and it is presently owned by Tom and Fran Towle.

Available
Price: US $2000
Contact to Purchase

Building Glacier National Park
Oil on Barnwood 46" x 19"

Petersen Ranch
The only clue to the scene in the photograph is the hand-written words on its back, “Taking boiler across McDonald Lake. G.N.P.”

The area was heavily forested. In fact, White Fish was known as “Stump Town,” for one had to drive one’s vehicle over tree stumps which were left in lieu of a normal road. To get a large piece of equipment, such as this boiler needed for the construction of one of the park buildings took a Herculean effort. Waiting until McDonald Lake was frozen, building a giant sled on which the equipment could ride, pulling the sled across the lake with work horses and man power was a brilliant solution, an American solution.

In 1895 the Blackfeet sold what is now the eastern slope of the park to the federal government for $1.5 million. The Great Northern Railway wanted to develop tourism to the area designated as Glacier National Park in 1910 by President Taft, but there were no roads into the area. Consequently they spent $1.5 million to build a series of huge lodges and chalets, along with camping sites. These structures were one-day horse rides apart, and the Great Northern created a one week’s vacation itinerary utilizing them. It is probably likely this boiler was the heating furnace for one of these fine buildings.

Alternately, this boiler may have supplied heat for the famous Lake McDonald Lodge, located at the end of the lake. It was built in 1914, and supposedly Charles Russell, who had a cabin nearby, created the pictographs around the lodge’s fireplace.

Its exact usage probably never will be known, but from this painting, we can truly appreciate the monumental task of carving out Glacier National Park and take pride in its accomplishment.

Availability: Sold

Please, No More Pictures, Daddy!
Oil on Barnwood 26" x 16"

Petersen Ranch
Based upon an old picture taken around mid-1920’s, these snow-covered children were obviously not too happy to stand still freezing while Dad took the picture with his box camera. The Petersons had a large, beautiful home located in Pleasant Valley, west of Kalispell. The children, Betty, who was Terry Siderius’ mom; Willard, nicknamed “Woodie”; Rodney; and Donald were enjoying a sledding outing. The children, each a year apart, ranged in age from perhaps seven or eight to ten or eleven. Three of them, sleds at the ready, obviously had been having a grand time. Then, there was Rodney, standing steadfastly seemingly to play soldier … or was he playing? The single shot shotgun was not a toy, there was no snow covering his body. He obviously stood in a military position, but why? Terry Siderius had no idea why he, too, was not sledding. Was he hunting for rabbits? No, the family did not eat rabbits. Talking to an elderly Montanan, I found the explanation; the Kalispell area had a very large wolf population. Especially in winter, when food was scarce, they were known to attack children. Rodney had been ordered to stand guard over his younger siblings to ensure they did not become the wolves’ dinner.

Available
Price: US $800
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Her Dream Ranch
Oil on Canvas 20" x 16"

Morris Ranch
Sitting in Helen Morris’ comfy, modern living room made it seem impossible we were inside what was once a two-room log cabin.

Helen’s parents, the Belvederes, married young in Tacoma, Washington. Her dad, born in Italy, was nineteen years old while her mom was just fourteen. Both died in the great flu epidemic of 1918 when she was just twenty-two months old. Helen, with one of her brothers, was adopted by locals. Another brother and sister were raised by folks living in other parts of the country, but the four, as adults, remained a family by having reunions whenever possible. Helen is now the lone survivor.

In 1904 her adopted grandparents bought their farm on Highway 40, and here is where she grew up, although, unfortunately, nothing remains except a hay shed. Each day, when Helen walked the ten-mile round-trip to school, she passed a ranch with a log cabin directly facing Highway 93, with a picturesque barn and tiny log cabin tucked behind a magnificent tree. Helen dreamed of owning this ranch.

When she was but eight, the Morris family moved into the farm across the river. In need of milk they sent their twelve-year-old son, David, to purchase some. The children struck up an instant friendship, and by the time they finished playing and he moseyed home, his mother, fearing the milk had soured, was furious!. Inseparable in both grade and high school, they became engaged in their senior year and married on their common birthday, November 24th. Both thought it fitting that Thanksgiving often fell on that date, for they indeed were thankful of their mutual love. On Christmas day, 2008, Dave died after a long siege with Alzheimer’s.

Dave knew of Helen’s aspiration of owning the ranch on Highway 93, which then was a quaint, quiet, country road, not the multi-lane artery between Kalispell and Whitefish it is today. When, shortly after their marriage, it went on the market, they snatched it up. The chap that owned it, a Mr. Dewar, was a strange, unfriendly sort of old hermit with a talking parrot. They discovered the one-room log house was the original homestead, where he and his mother lived until in 1904 he built the two-room cabin with its attached outside kitchen. The parrot was much friendlier than its master, and when the Morrises went to look at the house, it answered the door bell. Unfortunately the bird never learned to limit its body excretions to a confined area, and when old Dewar begged to include the bird as part of the sale, Dave and Helen declined. Thanks to the bird’s nasty habits, many areas of the inside had to be gutted and replaced. This is now the largest ranch within the city’s limits, and here they raised Tennessee Walking Horses and Black Angus cattle.

Availability: Sold

The Outfitter
Oil on Canvas 30" x 24"

Morris Ranch
Taking folks up into the national forests to hunt is an enterprise that causes heated arguments both pro and con. This is the tale of David Morris, a packer and guide, who has been memorialized in the Silvertip Basin for his conservation techniques and animal management program long before such things existed.

Dave, to support his family, also ranched, logged, and maintained the roads and ski slopes on the big mountain. Sometimes, when storms stretched into days upon days, he worked 24-hour, continual shifts clearing the roads. Sleep was something done after the storms subsided.

Dave always loved hiking and riding in the wilderness, particularly the Silvertip Basin, a rugged, steep area which was his sanctuary. His outfitter career began quite by chance. Locals and friends knew of his expertise and asked him to take them up to hunt for deer, mountain goats, bear and primarily elk. He gladly fulfilled their wishes and never charged. When someone suggested this was a way to make extra cash, he realized the potential of his friendly service. Thus began Dave’s life-long career as an outfitter. Three times per season he took ten hunters up to the Basin, where they stayed in stove-heated tents for ten days. He and his crew included among others, his brother, Lester; his wife, Helen; other relatives; and the present owner of the operation, Harry Workman. They made sure everybody had an enjoyable experience; got his much prized elk; and arrived safely back down, a challenging trip on those steep slippery trails.

All clients were picked up by Helen at the train station or airport and transported for a hearty, home-cooked meal before the adventure began. Her duties also included all the grocery shopping and that cooking best done in a real kitchen. In reality, the trek began long before the guests arrived. The campsite, the trail up to it, and the base camp had to be cleared and developed, adequate supplies for both hunters and horses had to be hauled up the Basin on horseback and made secure from bears. These included sleeping tents, the kitchen-dining tent, and wood for heat and cooking - the list was almost endless. To pack all this gear without injury to the horses, Dave, using a pair of portable scales, weighed everything to ensure the loads would be balanced and not too heavy. To guarantee he would not introduce foreign plants into the area, he grew on his ranch the wild grasses found in the Basin and packed this up for horse feed. Folks thought he was somewhat fool-hardy to raise and use Tennessee Walking Horses, but they proved to be a good choice. Sometimes the crew had to shovel the 12-mile track up the mountain, so the hunters could get to the destination safely. He limited his outfitting to 30 hunters per year, because he knew the size of the elk herds and felt any more would deplete the population. He cared for the environment, the animals, and his customers. To honor him the Forest Service named his hunting area after him.

When Dave contracted Alzheimer’s, Helen cared for him at home, but when he became too much for her to manage, he lived in a Kalispell nursing home. So that she could visit him daily, she begged rides and rarely missed a day. On Christmas, 2008, Dave passed away.

Bringing Down the Elk

Available
Price: US $750
Contact to Purchase

Bringing Down the Elk
2012 Oil on Canvas 20" x 16" framed in Old Barn Wood

David Morris was a packer and guide, who was memorialized in the Silvertip Basin for his conservation techniques and animal management program long before such things existed. Dave always loved hiking and riding in the wilderness, particularly the Silvertip Basin, a rugged, steep area, but his outfitter career began quite by chance. Locals and friends knew of his expertise and asked him to take them up to hunt for deer, mountain goats, bear and elk. He gladly fulfilled their wishes and never asked compensation. When someone suggested this was a way to make extra cash, he realized the potential of his friendly service. Thus began Dave’s life-long career as an outfitter. The trek began long before the guests arrived. The campsite, the trail up to it, and the base camp had to be cleared and developed, adequate supplies for both hunters and horses had to be hauled up on horseback and made secure from bears. These included sleeping tents, the kitchen-dining tent, and wood for heat and cooking. To pack all this gear without injury to the horses, Dave, using a pair of portable scales, weighed everything to ensure the loads would be balanced and not too heavy. To guarantee he would not introduce foreign plants into the area, he grew on his ranch the wild grasses found in the Basin and packed up those for horse feed. Folks thought he was fool-hardy to raise and use Tennessee Walking Horses, but that breed proved to be a good choice. Sometimes the crew had to shovel the 12-mile track up the mountain, so the hunters could get to the destination safely. He limited his outfitting to 30 hunters per year, because he knew the size of the elk herds and felt any more would deplete the population. He cared for the environment, the animals, and his customers. To honor him the Forest Service named his hunting area after him.

Available
Price: US $1300
Contact to Purchase

Mending Fence
Oil on Barnwood 26.75" x 21.5"

O'Connell Ranch
With over 40,000 sheep and a large herd of cattle, all destined for the military who were fighting in the second World War, maintaining fences made the difference between success and failure for the ranch. Atop a work horse and leading two others loaded with gear, food, and tent, Larry’s dad, Chuck, is about to embark on a two-week journey to mend the ranch’s fences. Back then there were neither automatic post-hole diggers nor electric wire strung and connected to a battery. It was hard, grunt work where one never knew what or whom he would encounter.

Larry’s dad was truly a hard worker, who also supported the family as a miner in the Flathead Mine before ranching.

Available
Price: US $1200
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Hog Heaven
Oil on Canvas 30" x 24"

O'Connell Ranch
Here, on land near Lake Mary Ronan and the town of Niarada, was a ranch called Hog Heaven, where Larry O’Connell; his parents, Charles and Jean; and grandparents lived. A beautiful, picturesque area, Lake Mary Ronan and Flathead Lake were just over the farthest hill.

The ranch had a rather exciting history, for it was the hideout of a band of horse thieves! They stole horses in Wyoming, wintered them on this ranch, then drove them to Idaho or Oregon to sell. Needless to say the owners of the horses were unhappy with the arrangement. A posse chased the bad guys to the ranch where a terrible shoot-out occurred. As a child Larry and his cousins dug bullets, rather nice souvenirs of the famous battle, out of the log walls of the buildings.

Thanks to his two trusty dogs, the area’s many rattlesnakes were no problem. The dogs worked as a team, one distracting the snake while the other went in for the kill.

Grandma’s first husband was Joe Weigle, and his father was from Bavaria. He had a few enemies and once failed to return from a hunting trip. They found his dead body shot in the back of the head, which death was somehow ruled a suicide by the powers to be. Her second husband, Louie O’Connell, who bought the place in the early 1930’s, also had a sad ending; he liked his whiskey, and one night fell down a flight of steps, broke his neck, and died around 1945. Grandma sold the ranch in 1947 to Miles City folks, and later on it wound up being purchased by the Flathead Indians. They returned the land to its original state by burning down all the buildings, which broke Larry’s heart, and he has requested that when he dies his ashes be dropped on this place he loved so much.

The building in the center of the painting, along with the tent, were the living quarters of the sheepherders. The ranch had a wartime contract to supply cattle and sheep to the military, and to fulfill the contract, they raised twenty bands of 2,000 sheep each. Perhaps it is some of their wash hanging in the sagebrush and on the car.

Poley Opalka, an 80-85 year old cowboy who helped on cattle roundups when he either could or felt liked it, came from Texas with the cattle drives and settled near O’Connell’s ranch. He was pretty much a loner who claimed the reason he stayed in Montana was he was tired of the dust, the heat. and being shot at by the Indians.

Larry’s mom was a city girl from Kalispell who became a first grade teacher in Hot Springs. On one of her first dates with Chuck he took her to a gathering at the Niarada dance hall where they danced the night away, love blossomed, and marriage followed. Along came Larry, who unfortunately for him, had his own mother as his first grade teacher. She did not take kindly to his behaving in class and promptly flunked him. Yet, if she had been graded by Grandma, she too might have flunked. She knew little of ranching life, but thanks to grandma’s kind coaching, she learned quickly.

Available
Price: US $900
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Magnificent
Oil on Canvas 24" x 16"

O'Connell Ranch
This farm, homesteaded by Bill Curran, was the largest farm in western Montana. Mr. Curran liked his whiskey, but his wife did not approve, as Larry’s dad and he found a profusion of empty whiskey bottles hidden in the barn. The Curran family lived in a dugout until he built his log house in which they lived.

Larry O’Connell’s great-uncle built the brick-house in 1898. The Stahl brothers had the first brickyard in the valley and they used their product to build the impressive home,. Larry’s grandmother bought the place in 1947. The house, which has been modernized with decks and porches, is now the O’Connell’s home. The barn, still looking almost new, was built in 1900 by commercial barn-builders.

Interestingly, Larry sold the original log cabin for $3,500 to a chap, who came and carefully numbered the logs before disassembling it. He loaded the giant jig-saw-puzzle into his truck with intentions of rebuilding it elsewhere.

Availability: Sold

The Red Barn
Oil on Canvas 16" x 20"

Siderius Ranch
In 1900 in Modersville, Michigan, Peter Siderius arrived into this world. He was one of 14 children born to Everet Siderius and his wife, Gertrude De Boer, both natives of the Netherlands. When land was opening up in Montana in 1907 the family moved to Kalispell, where, as a child, Peter helped the family financially by delivering their farm’s milk and other products around town and the reservation. Being second oldest, he always had to fetch the midwife when his mother was delivering a child and sadly, had to run and get his aunt when his baby sister, Susie, died. Pete was never educated beyond the eighth grade. He worked as a logger at the Somers Tie Mill to help support his family until he was 29. Then he met a charming school marm, Louise Johnson, who grew up in Idaho. He gave her a ride one night on a load of wood and fell in love. They were married at the First Presbyterian Church in Kalispell in 1929, then they moved to Somers. Pete continued bucking railroad ties by hand at the mill, which means he carried and loaded about 500 ties per day. Each tie averaged about 150 pounds, and loads ranged between 300-400 pounds. He continued doing this for 25 years until his company bought a forklift that he operated. He and Louise had six living children retired in 1965, and moved to Bigfork.

This ranch has been in the family since 1940, and the barn was built in 1918 by Pete Paoli. Half of their half-section of land was homesteaded in 1893 and changed hands several times before Paoli purchased it in 1904. Interestingly, back in 1895 loan rates were 18 per cent! The house, which has since been replaced, was built in 1902, and the metal roof on the barn was added in the 60’s. There is a non-freezing spring that flows 5,200 gallons per minute. Tom, Pete Siderius’ son, now owns and operates the farm with his wife, Terry. Pete Paoli’s children fondly remembers sitting in the hay loft with their cousins dangling something on a rope in front of a concrete wall to annoy the ram, which would try to butt it. They would jerk the object up, and the ram butted the concrete and staggered away. One day, however, the ram smashed a hole into the barn! Score one for the ram.

The entire Siderius’ extended family gathers every three years thanks to Pete’s brother Mitch, who fled Montana and among other ventures, opened a popular fish restaurant in Florida. When he died, his will provided a trust fund, for the family reunions.

Available
Price: US $1000
Contact to Purchase

Great Uncle Was Smitten
Oil on Canvas 11.5" x 20"

Doll Ranch
She came from Minnesota to visit her brother, Oscar Peterson and his family. Selma Peterson’s elegance, charm, and beauty surpassed anything Frank Doll had seen. They fell in love, and Frank soon married his doll. Frank and Selma bought and operated the famous Dillon Hotel in downtown Kalispell. During its heyday it was the elite hotel in the city. Though it has been razed, the Doll family will always be remembered for Lake Dahl, the beautiful lake named in their honor in the Flathead area.

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Copyright 1998-2012
©Jane Stanfel